Quick Answer: What Is The Difference Between Juxtaposition And Irony?

What is an example of a juxtaposition?

Juxtaposition in literary terms is the showing contrast by concepts placed side by side.

An example of juxtaposition are the quotes “Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country”, and “Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate”, both by John F..

What is irony confused with?

Irony is often confused with sarcasm. … Dramatic irony is inherent in speeches or a situation of a drama and is understood by the audience but not grasped by the characters in the play. Situational irony is an outcome that turns out to be very different from what was expected.

What does juxtaposition mean in English?

: the act or an instance of placing two or more things side by side often to compare or contrast or to create an interesting effect an unusual juxtaposition of colors also : the state of being so placed contrasting shapes placed in juxtaposition to each other.

How do you identify juxtaposition?

Download This SampleJuxtaposition is the act of placing two elements, characters, settings, ideas, words, or things side by side, or close together, to allow for comparison and/or contrast. … Essentially, juxtaposition is like making lists in your head about things you see, read, or experience.More items…•

What is juxtaposition in writing?

Juxtaposition means placing two things side by side so as to highlight their differences. Writers use it for rhetorical effect.

What is juxtaposition in a sentence?

the fact of two things being seen or placed closed together with contrasting effect. Examples of Juxtaposition in a sentence. 1. The reality clearly shows a cultural juxtaposition between rich people and poor people.

What’s the opposite of juxtaposition?

What is the opposite of juxtapose?disconnectdisseveruncoupleunhooksectionundounfastendelinkpartdisjoin13 more rows

What is a synonym for juxtaposition?

Synonyms & Near Synonyms for juxtaposition. abutment.

What is an example of anaphora?

Anaphora is a figure of speech in which words repeat at the beginning of successive clauses, phrases, or sentences. … For example, Martin Luther King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech contains anaphora: “So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.

What is ironic juxtaposition?

A kind of visual technique, usually (though not always) played for laughs. It features two objects, people, or images in proximity to provide a contrast to one another. Frequently, it’s an inanimate object, such as a sign or billboard, and something in or of the real world.

Is juxtaposition a form of irony?

And that’s the core of juxtaposition. It happens when two or more people, things, or situations are placed side by side in a comparison that emphasizes style, irony, humor or sadness. It can be intentional or unintentional.

Is antithesis and juxtaposition the same?

Antithesis is also a specific type of juxtaposition. Antithesis is a narrower term than juxtaposition in two key ways: … Juxtaposition is a literary device that simply refers to a contrast set up between two things in some way, but it does not necessarily have to involve a defined grammatical structure.

What is the difference between juxtaposition and oxymoron?

The difference between juxtaposition and oxymoron is one of specificity: oxymoron is specifically a phrase containing two contradictory elements, whereas juxtaposition may refer to the position of two different characters, settings, or other plot elements. Oxymoron is a specific type of juxtaposition.

Why is juxtaposition used in literature?

Juxtaposition is an important literary term in that it highlights contrasts between two things but also invites comparisons. This device can be used to fully illustrate a character in a novel, complicate a poem’s subjects, or convince an audience to feel a certain way about the subjects.

What does anaphora mean?

An anaphora is a rhetorical device in which a word or expression is repeated at the beginning of a number of sentences, clauses, or phrases.